Goal of a Quilt Show?

“A quilt show represents a chance to be recognized for our talent and our skill. It is also an opportunity to dream about and plan our next project.” from The Sister Blocks by Edi McGinnis, 2001

Since 1995 I’ve participated in the QUILT of Northwest Arkansas quilt show–that is two decades! Our biennial quilt shows happen every other year in the odd numbered years. Each show becomes a “quilt immersion” weekend for me. I swim through three days surrounded by quilters who are surrounded by quilts, by fabric, and by the tools to make quilts. We arrive on Thursday with enthusiasm for setting up the show and special displays. Then we pack up on Saturday evening with more ideas and inspiration.

Planning and organizing for this complex event takes two years–we had two talented leaders this year! Kathy Garringer has served as our guild president and has just been re-elected. Diane Crandell pulled all the details together as quilt show chair.

Our guild president at left (also reigning queen) and her quilt show chair, Diane Crandell, both giddy with enthusiasm at the 2015 quilt show.

Our guild president at left (also reigning queen) and her quilt show chair, Diane Crandell, both giddy with enthusiasm at the 2015 quilt show.

I snapped this photo of them together at the show on Friday. Both are enthusiastic quilters and hard workers on behalf of our guild.

Joan Beyette and I pulled quilts from our own collections and borrowed from others in the guild to create our special exhibit on string pieced quilts. We described the exhibit this way:

Strings and Things: Creative Scrap Quilts: String quilts are made from strips of fabric–usually scraps, but there are plain and fancy versions of string quilts. Quiltmakers may use random scraps, selvages, blue jean scraps, or leftover pieces of fabric from other projects or even worn clothes. The strings may then be sewn to form a pattern or design to please the viewer’s eye.  Sometimes the fabric is stabilized on a foundation of newspapers or fabric. This informal display of vintage and contemporary string quilts may expand your idea of how to use favorite scraps with new possibilities.

We included a variety of unique examples of what women have pieced for pieces of scraps. See for your self in these photos. Do you have a favorite?

Dolls love quilts, too!

Dolls love quilts, too!

Paula found this framed version of string piecing set in a window frame at a local thrift shop and paired it with a vintage set of carnival glass.

Paula found this framed version of string piecing set in a window frame at a local thrift shop and paired it with a vintage set of carnival glass.

From a modern "Bars" quilt by Sally LeBeouf to a vintage 1950s Seminole Indian jacket from Paula's girlhood, we had items to surprise everyone.

From a modern “Bars” quilt by Sally LeBeouf to a vintage 1950s Seminole Indian jacket from Paula’s girlhood, we had items to surprise everyone.

Diamonds, stars or simple squares--each is a possibility with string piecing. some use a paper foundation, some a muslin foundation and others use no foundation at all.

Diamonds, stars or simple squares–each is a possibility with string piecing. some use a paper foundation, some a muslin foundation and others use no foundation at all.

Therese Ramsey's exploration of using selvage edges to create her "Spools" quilt was a favorite of many visitors.

Therese Ramsey’s exploration of using selvage edges to create her “Spools”
quilt was a favorite of many visitors.

The center quilt is a vintage spider web design. Adjacent to the left is another version of the web design. On the far left is an unusual curved path design which brought many comments.

The center quilt is a vintage spider web design. Adjacent to the left is another version of the web design. On the far left is an unusual curved path design which brought many comments.

The center section was begun in the late 1990s for a string piecing class I taught at Quilt Your Heart Out.. when I found this bold floral in my stash, I finished it in time for the exhibit.

The center section was begun in the late 1990s for a string piecing class I taught at Quilt Your Heart Out.. when I found this bold floral in my stash, I finished it in time for the exhibit.

Satisfied with a job well done, we undid all the hard work of building our “quilt city” on Thursday! Clearing out and packing up went well with many hands contributing. My last image is one of our president Kathy Garringer (still wearing her patchwork crown) shoving a huge dust broom over the floor of the empty building. She’s an amazing woman.

 

 

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2 Responses to Goal of a Quilt Show?

  1. What beautiful memories and beautiful exhibits!
    Dedication by many hard workers!

  2. Therese Ramsey says:

    Great summary of the show. Your special exhibits are are so inspiring always. The quilt show was a lot of hard work and a beautiful wonderland of quilts resulted! Seeing pictures of your string quilts makes me want to go sew!!

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